Visual

Pottery at Play

Form and creativity with Jodee Adams
  • Google+

mug-o.jpg

Jodee Adams wasn’t born in Bellingham, but that doesn’t mean she doesn’t belong here. We caught up with the 31-year-old potter and painter to ask her a few questions before she joins a roster of other area artists to show and sell work at the Holiday Make.Sale happening Sat., Dec. 14 at Make.Shift Art Space.

Cascadia Weekly: Where do you make your art?
Jodee Adams: I work out of the basement that I rent—there’s a mud room for my pottery—and fire the pieces at Persis Gayle’s Frailey Mountain Pottery in Arlington.

CW: Where does your love of pottery come from?
JA: I’ve always enjoyed drawing and doing art, and had ceramics at my public high school. I didn’t have it in college, though, and, one Christmas, asked my mom for classes. From that point on, I was pretty obsessed.

CW: The luminary owls you make are very cool. What’s the story behind those?
JA: I’ve been making those for three or four years, since the Lucky Dumpster in Edison had an open call for artists, with a Russian nesting doll theme. Their shapes looked so much like owls. It took off from there.

CW: They’re one of your bestsellers. Are you tired of making them yet?
JA:No. It’s been been good having something that’s forced me to stick with an idea for a long time. I’m into it now. I’m refining, and getting more efficient. I’ve probably made 200 by this point.

CW: You’ve been in Bellingham for more than a year. What’s so great about living here?
JA: I grew up in Bellevue, and have slowly worked my way north from Seattle. This will be home base for a while. I love the social stimulus here, the artistic support—and Casa Que Pasa. I’m also a trail runner, and live right up against Galbraith, so I don’t have to travel far to be in cool forests.

CW: Have you taken part in the Make.Shift holiday sale before?
JA: Yes, this will be my second year. It’s great; it’s really fun to be around other Bellingham artists, and it’s a pretty relaxing environment. It’s not a bad place to spend the day.

CW: What do you hope people get out of your art?
JA: I like making utilitarian objects—like coffee mugs—that can be used every day. It means I can infiltrate people’s lives more. I like being part of a daily ritual through art. Simple things give me pleasure, and that was what attracted me to pottery initially.

CW: I’ve noticed that with your pieces—your mugs, monster heads, and even the owls—that every piece is unique. Is that on purpose?
JA: Every piece is very different. I don’t want to get bored with the process. I like to allow for the work to evolve, and it works better if I approach it more open-mindedly. It’s all about trying to keep it fresh.

CW: You work at the Skagit Valley Co-op on a part-time basis, but also have time for your art. Do you hope to make your living with your creativity someday?
JA: I wouldn’t be a potter if I was trying to get rich. It’s fun. I can make it a little of my livelihood. Right now, there are a lot of times when I basically get to play with Play-Doh all day. I love that.

For more info about Adams’ work, go to http://www.batcavepottery.weebly.com

blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Cascadia Weekly

Home | Views | | Archives | Advertising | Contact | RSS

© 1998-2014 Cascadia Newspaper Company LLC | P.O. Box 2833, Bellingham WA 98227-2833 | (360) 647-8200