Words

Falling in Love with the World

Thomas Fleischner works to revitalize natural history

Attend

More:

WHAT:Tom Fleischner reads from The Way of Natural History
WHEN: 4pm Sun., July 8
WHERE: Village Books, 1200 11th St.
COST: Entry is free
INFO: http://www.villagebooks.com

Wednesday, July 4, 2012

Fleischner lived in Bellingham from 1979-1988, attending Western Washington University for his Master of Biology degree, working as an interpretive naturalist and backcountry ranger for North Cascades National Park, and serving as co-director for North Cascades Institute. I had the opportunity to talk with him while he is back in town, readying for his July 8 presentation at Village Books.

Cascadia Weekly: How do you define natural history as it pertains to your new book?

Thomas Fleischner: For some years now, I’ve defined natural history as “the practice of intentional, focused attentiveness to the more-than-human world, guided by honesty and accuracy.” Simply put, it’s the practice of paying attention.

In this book, I gathered together a variety of voices—poets, artists, musicians, philosophers, scientists and others—to hear how this practice of paying attention to the wider world has served their work and play. Natural history is a fundamental human trait—and need. Their stories show how many different ways this can be manifested.

CW: So, natural history involves a way of seeing the world?

TF: In my mind, natural history is a verb, not a noun—it’s the practice of attending, not just the body of knowledge that accrues from the observations. I’ve come to refer to natural history as the practice of falling in love with the world.

Natural history at its best involves integration between sciences, arts and humanities. It’s at the center of a liberal approach to education: we pay attention to the world around us and respond in a variety of ways—through a painting, a poem, an essay or a scientific monograph.

CW: What are the roots of this tradition?

TF: Natural history is the oldest continuous human endeavor. But—and this is what concerns me—there’s never been a time in the history of the world when natural history was practiced less than it is today. Still, I’m ultimately optimistic. Humans are wired to do natural history—it’s literally what we evolved to do: pay attention.

CW: There are a lot of new technological ways to access and appreciate nature today. Why do we still need to to get outdoors?

TF: These new technologies are wonderful, and provide all sorts of new channels into observing nature. There’s lots of examples of ways they’ve helped us understand the world. These technologies are also really important in that they can provide an entry point for young people, brought up in this electronic world, to pay attention to what’s around them.

But it’s key that it doesn’t stop there. It’s vital that they take the next step and get out there and get muddy and watch what that bird is really doing or how the beetle’s carapace glistens in the sun. Those are the experiences that create the opportunity for falling in love with the world.

More Words...
Climber's Corner
The highs and lows

You may have heard that it’s Whatcom County Library System’s 75th anniversary year, and to celebrate we’ve created the Read & Share program featuring Leif Whittaker’s excellent memoir My Old Man and the Mountain

Whittaker is the son of “Big Jim” Whittaker, the first American to…

more »
Kate Tempest
A way with words

Warning: If you’re on a tight schedule, don’t search for Kate Tempest on Youtube. If you don’t heed this admonition, there’s a very good chance you’ll spend the next hour—or however long the clip is—watching the mesmerizing performer bringing her fascinating stories to life with a…

more »
Deep River
Epic action on the Columbia

In his debut novel, Matterhorn, based on his experiences as a Marine in Vietnam, Pacific Northwest author Karl Marlantes established himself as a master of evocative settings and characters developed over time. Deep River, his second novel, is a sprawling family epic set along the mouth of…

more »
Events
Today
Wishes and Dreams Call for Art

10:00am|Gallery Syre

Whatcomics Call for Art

10:00am|Whatcom County

Whatcom Housing Week

10:00am|Whatcom County

Northwest Paella

6:30pm|Community Food Co-op

Poetrynight

7:00pm|Alternative Library

Guffawingham

9:00pm|Firefly Lounge

Tomorrow
Whatcom Housing Week

10:00am|Whatcom County

Western Gallery Reception

5:00pm|Western Gallery

Ditching Plastics Workshop

6:00pm|Chuckanut Center

Artist Workshop

6:00pm|Bellingham Public Library

All-Paces Run

6:00pm|Fairhaven Runners

Bellingham Reads

6:30pm|Bellingham Public Library

Skagit Reads with Clyde Ford

6:30pm|Burlington Public Library

Five-Ingredient Autumn Meals

6:30pm|Community Food Co-op

Audubon Society Meeting

7:00pm|Whatcom Museum's Old City Hall

Books & Brews

7:00pm|Overflow Taps

Skagit Folk Dancers

7:00pm|Bayview Civic Hall

Teton Gravity Research's Roadless

7:30pm|Mount Baker Theatre

Second City's Greatest Hits

7:30pm|Lincoln Theatre

Wednesday
Whatcom Housing Week

10:00am|Whatcom County

City Club Meeting

11:30am|Northwood Hall

Group Run

6:00pm|Skagit Running Company

Histories & Mysteries Book Club

6:30pm|Everson Library

MIke Allen Quartet

7:00pm|Sylvia Center for the Arts

Advice for Future Corpses

7:00pm|St. Luke's Community Health Education Center

Decriminalize Sex Work

7:00pm|Academic West 205

Matilda the Musical

7:30pm|Lincoln Theatre

see our complete calendar »