The Gristle

Beachhead

Wednesday, January 25, 2017

BEACHHEAD: To the victors go the spoils of war.

Sen. Doug Ericksen went out on a limb last May, bringing Republican candidate Donald Trump to Lynden for a rally. That rally cost local taxpayers $155,000, with Whatcom County agencies alone on the hook for more than $129,000 and no way to recover the loss. But it was a great success for Ericksen, who received his reward this week:

The agency he has railed most strongly against is now his to lead.

Ericksen was named as part of the “beachhead team” to take over at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Energy & Environment News reported this week. He is joined by former state Sen. Don Benton of Clark County, another booster of Trump in Washington.

It’s an interesting term, a military term for defended position taken from the enemy by landing forces, from which an attack can be launched. And in its sxpression, this means war.

The beachhead teams will lay the groundwork for the new administration’s policies and serve as White House representatives until Cabinet officials are confirmed and bigger teams dispatched. At energy and environmental agencies, the teams are largely composed of Trump campaign officials and aides who assisted him during the interim between his election and inauguration as president.

Benton will serve as the senior White House advisor on the team, effectively its chief, while Ericksen will serve as communications director for the team.

Benton, who served in Washington’s Senate from 1997 until last year, is known for “self-confidence, at-times bombastic rhetoric and a willingness to get into political brawls,” The Seattle Times reported. Trump and Benton bonded when Trump visited Washington state last May, and they shared a McDonald’s lunch.

“I had a Filet-O-Fish and he had a Big Mac,” Benton told the newspaper.

An ardent critic of Agenda 21, an obscure non-binding resolution of the United Nations signed when George Bush Sr. was in office (that produces mysterious storms in the brains of movement conservatives), firebrand Benton helped fire up the crowd for Trump at an August rally at Xfinity Arena in Everett.

Appointing Benton to head an environmental agency, the Seattle Times editorial board wrote, was “like using a paper shredder to edit a document.”

Ericksen currently chairs the state Senate’s Energy, Environment and Telecommunications Committee, where he has been remarkably effective in highjacking state initiatives to address the public costs of the fossil fuel industry, whether stalling action on climate change, rail safety or efforts to move the state to a more sustainable energy profile. The Whatcom County Republican is also the Legislature’s third-largest recipient of political contributions from fossil fuel companies.

When he’s not working directly for his largest political contributors, Ericksen sponsors bills that are perhaps best understood as wedge issues—they generate heat but little light on both sides of the aisle, while polishing his bona fides among local conservatives. Among these are efforts to criminalize forms of protest such as those seen in Bellingham over the weekend, described as “economic terrorism” against local commerce; as well as a series of constitutional amendments introduced to further ensnare and paralyze the Legislature as they work through issues like the funding of public education. And, yes, Ericksen opposed allowing transgender people access to the bathrooms that match their gender identity, introducing a bathroom bill last year.

None of these wedge actions have gone anywhere, and serve instead to tie up time and resources in committee, burning up the legislative clock so those resources cannot be applied to productive work.

Ericksen said he intends to keep both jobs, working in both Washingtons. But he may in fact be headed for a larger federal role that is incompatible with his duties as a representative of the state and district.

So while the nation may suffer from the sorts of dynamiting of federal environmental policy that we can expect from the Trump team, the appointment may signal an opportunity for Ericksen to move on. Getting him a better job could end with Whatcom getting a better, more productive representative in Olympia—and for all that, we wish him well!

EPA’s beachhead team is tasked with laying out an action plan for the agency for slashing budgets and regulations. Among key initiatives to stop are greenhouse gas rules for new and existing power plants, automobile standards, and the so-called Waters of the U.S. rule—a technical document that defines which rivers, streams, lakes and marshes fall under the jurisdiction of EPA and, ominously, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The plan also calls for an executive order “barring EPA from overruling federal/state regulatory/permit decisions unless in clear violation of established law.”

Cherry Point could well be the first beachhead in a short war to strip away recent public wins concerning the use of state aquatic lands for the export of fossil fuels.

In the most recent gutting of the EPA’s role, the Trump administration this week ordered the agency to halt all contracts, grants and interagency agreements pending a review, according to reports.

“Basically,” an EPA staff member told Reuters, “no money moving anywhere until they can take a look.”

The EPA awards billions of dollars worth of grants and contracts every year to support programs around environmental testing, cleanups and research. It was unclear if the freeze would impact existing contracts, grants and agreements or just future ones.

We’ve written before of regulatory capture, a form of government failure that occurs when an agency created to act in the public interest, instead advances the commercial or political interests of the industry or sector it is charged with regulating. The Trump administration seems to intend to take this to an entirely new level, stripping away even the pretense that the agency reflects some public purpose while folding up the tent and setting fire to the campsite.

Doug may have a new job, but at a smaller and much impoverished operation.

Smoking Crow
Past Columns
New Energy

January 17, 2018

Save Our Salish Sea

January 10, 2018

Predictions of Protractions

January 3, 2018

Parsing the Puzzle

December 27, 2017

Camp Kelli

December 20, 2017

Gifts of the Three Magi

December 13, 2017

Utility

December 6, 2017

Gulag Goulash

November 29, 2017

Bronze Rule

November 22, 2017

Napkin Plan

November 15, 2017

Less Wave Than Slosh

November 8, 2017

Statistics of Shame

November 1, 2017

Cashing Out, Cashing In

October 25, 2017

A Creeping Paralysis

October 18, 2017

Fire and Water

October 11, 2017

Blockadia

September 27, 2017

Ounce of Prevention

September 20, 2017

Dwelling On It

September 13, 2017

Keeping the Dream Alive

September 6, 2017

A Bridge Too Far?

August 23, 2017

Events
Today
Cascade Games Convention

9:00am|Bellingham Cruise Terminal

Wild Things

9:30am|Lake Padden Park

Garage Sale and Health Fair

12:00pm|Settlemyer Hall

Books and Bites

2:00pm|Blaine Library

Post-Holiday Detox

2:00pm|Cordata Community Food Co-op

Coffee Tasting

3:00pm|Camber Cafe

Food Not Bombs

4:00pm|Downtown Bellingham

Bellingham Folk Festival

4:30pm|Bellingham Unitarian Fellowship

Art Auction Gala

5:30pm|Whatcom Museum's Lightcatcher Building

Anacortes Women's March

6:00pm|Depot Arts Center

Family Story Night

6:00pm|Fairhaven Library

Sierra Club Winter Member Party

6:30pm|Boundary Bay Brewery

Xanadu

7:00pm|Bellingham Arts Academy for Youth

Opera Scenes

7:30pm|Performing Arts Center

The Flick

7:30pm|Sylvia Center for the Arts

Tropical Heat Wave Dance

8:00pm|Majestic

Five for Fighting

8:00pm|Mount Baker Theatre

Space Trek, Backyard Brawl

8:00pm|Upfront Theatre

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Tomorrow
Cascade Games Convention

9:00am|Bellingham Cruise Terminal

Garage Sale and Health Fair

12:00pm|Settlemyer Hall

Bellingham Folk Festival

4:30pm|Bellingham Unitarian Fellowship

Xanadu

7:00pm|Bellingham Arts Academy for Youth

The Flick

7:30pm|Sylvia Center for the Arts

Space Trek, Backyard Brawl

8:00pm|Upfront Theatre

Pancake Breakfast

8:00am|Ferndale Senior Center

VFW Breakfast

8:00am|VFW Hall

Mason Bee Management

9:00am|Garden Spot Nursery

Smoking Crow Opening

9:00am|Smoking Crow

Plant Society Field Trip

10:00am|Birch Bay State Park

Nordic Ski Ambassadors

10:00am|SnoPark at Salmon Ridge

Skagit Eagle Festival

10:00am|Howard Miller Steelhead Park

March on Bellingham

10:00am|Bellingham City Hall

Winter Farmers Market

10:00am|Depot Market Square

Of marching and mending

12:00pm

Travel to Cuzco and Machu PIcchu

1:00pm|Blaine Library

Cedar Weaving Workshop

2:00pm|Lynden Library

Teddy Bear Biographies

2:00pm|Ferndale Library

Learn to Grow a Vegetable Garden

2:00pm|Sumas Library

Mona Openings

2:00pm|Museum of Northwest Art

Mysticism in Art

2:00pm|Skagit County Historical Museum

Exploring Port

2:00pm|Seifert & Jones Wine Merchants

The Fight Against Human Trafficking

3:00pm|Everson Library

Kindgom Quest

4:00pm|Village Books

Music and Memories

5:00pm|Swinomish Casino & Lodge

Robert Burns Supper

5:30pm|Littlefield Celtic Center

Ensemble Electra

7:30pm|Jansen Art Center

The Good Lovelies

7:30pm|Lincoln Theatre

Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea

7:30pm|McIntyre Hall

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Sunday
Cascade Games Convention

9:00am|Bellingham Cruise Terminal

Bellingham Folk Festival

4:30pm|Bellingham Unitarian Fellowship

Xanadu

7:00pm|Bellingham Arts Academy for Youth

Skagit Eagle Festival

10:00am|Howard Miller Steelhead Park

Community Breakfast

8:00am|American Legion Post #43

Rabbit Ride

8:00am|Fairhaven Bicycle

Rabbit Ride

8:30am|Fairhaven Bicycle

Bellingham Chamber Music Society

3:00pm|First Congregational Church

Nonfiction and Memoir Writing Group

3:00pm|Village Books

Southside Community Meal

5:00pm|Our Saviour's Lutheran Church

Way North Comedy

7:00pm|Farmstrong Brewing Co.

see our complete calendar »

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