The Gristle

Beachhead

Wednesday, January 25, 2017

BEACHHEAD: To the victors go the spoils of war.

Sen. Doug Ericksen went out on a limb last May, bringing Republican candidate Donald Trump to Lynden for a rally. That rally cost local taxpayers $155,000, with Whatcom County agencies alone on the hook for more than $129,000 and no way to recover the loss. But it was a great success for Ericksen, who received his reward this week:

The agency he has railed most strongly against is now his to lead.

Ericksen was named as part of the “beachhead team” to take over at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Energy & Environment News reported this week. He is joined by former state Sen. Don Benton of Clark County, another booster of Trump in Washington.

It’s an interesting term, a military term for defended position taken from the enemy by landing forces, from which an attack can be launched. And in its sxpression, this means war.

The beachhead teams will lay the groundwork for the new administration’s policies and serve as White House representatives until Cabinet officials are confirmed and bigger teams dispatched. At energy and environmental agencies, the teams are largely composed of Trump campaign officials and aides who assisted him during the interim between his election and inauguration as president.

Benton will serve as the senior White House advisor on the team, effectively its chief, while Ericksen will serve as communications director for the team.

Benton, who served in Washington’s Senate from 1997 until last year, is known for “self-confidence, at-times bombastic rhetoric and a willingness to get into political brawls,” The Seattle Times reported. Trump and Benton bonded when Trump visited Washington state last May, and they shared a McDonald’s lunch.

“I had a Filet-O-Fish and he had a Big Mac,” Benton told the newspaper.

An ardent critic of Agenda 21, an obscure non-binding resolution of the United Nations signed when George Bush Sr. was in office (that produces mysterious storms in the brains of movement conservatives), firebrand Benton helped fire up the crowd for Trump at an August rally at Xfinity Arena in Everett.

Appointing Benton to head an environmental agency, the Seattle Times editorial board wrote, was “like using a paper shredder to edit a document.”

Ericksen currently chairs the state Senate’s Energy, Environment and Telecommunications Committee, where he has been remarkably effective in highjacking state initiatives to address the public costs of the fossil fuel industry, whether stalling action on climate change, rail safety or efforts to move the state to a more sustainable energy profile. The Whatcom County Republican is also the Legislature’s third-largest recipient of political contributions from fossil fuel companies.

When he’s not working directly for his largest political contributors, Ericksen sponsors bills that are perhaps best understood as wedge issues—they generate heat but little light on both sides of the aisle, while polishing his bona fides among local conservatives. Among these are efforts to criminalize forms of protest such as those seen in Bellingham over the weekend, described as “economic terrorism” against local commerce; as well as a series of constitutional amendments introduced to further ensnare and paralyze the Legislature as they work through issues like the funding of public education. And, yes, Ericksen opposed allowing transgender people access to the bathrooms that match their gender identity, introducing a bathroom bill last year.

None of these wedge actions have gone anywhere, and serve instead to tie up time and resources in committee, burning up the legislative clock so those resources cannot be applied to productive work.

Ericksen said he intends to keep both jobs, working in both Washingtons. But he may in fact be headed for a larger federal role that is incompatible with his duties as a representative of the state and district.

So while the nation may suffer from the sorts of dynamiting of federal environmental policy that we can expect from the Trump team, the appointment may signal an opportunity for Ericksen to move on. Getting him a better job could end with Whatcom getting a better, more productive representative in Olympia—and for all that, we wish him well!

EPA’s beachhead team is tasked with laying out an action plan for the agency for slashing budgets and regulations. Among key initiatives to stop are greenhouse gas rules for new and existing power plants, automobile standards, and the so-called Waters of the U.S. rule—a technical document that defines which rivers, streams, lakes and marshes fall under the jurisdiction of EPA and, ominously, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The plan also calls for an executive order “barring EPA from overruling federal/state regulatory/permit decisions unless in clear violation of established law.”

Cherry Point could well be the first beachhead in a short war to strip away recent public wins concerning the use of state aquatic lands for the export of fossil fuels.

In the most recent gutting of the EPA’s role, the Trump administration this week ordered the agency to halt all contracts, grants and interagency agreements pending a review, according to reports.

“Basically,” an EPA staff member told Reuters, “no money moving anywhere until they can take a look.”

The EPA awards billions of dollars worth of grants and contracts every year to support programs around environmental testing, cleanups and research. It was unclear if the freeze would impact existing contracts, grants and agreements or just future ones.

We’ve written before of regulatory capture, a form of government failure that occurs when an agency created to act in the public interest, instead advances the commercial or political interests of the industry or sector it is charged with regulating. The Trump administration seems to intend to take this to an entirely new level, stripping away even the pretense that the agency reflects some public purpose while folding up the tent and setting fire to the campsite.

Doug may have a new job, but at a smaller and much impoverished operation.

Past Columns
A Working Waterfront?

October 15, 2019

Keep Working

October 9, 2019

Signs of Hate

October 2, 2019

Trust Gap

September 25, 2019

Netse Mot

September 18, 2019

A Rising Tide

September 11, 2019

The Power of Change

September 4, 2019

Hands Against Hate

August 28, 2019

Ground Zero

August 21, 2019

Fire and Frost

August 14, 2019

The Fury and the Folly

August 7, 2019

Due East II

July 31, 2019

The Real Social Network

July 17, 2019

Due East

July 3, 2019

Thin Green Line

June 26, 2019

A Journeyman’s Journey

June 12, 2019

Her Story

June 5, 2019

Do Overs

May 29, 2019

Events
Today
Fall Lynden Craft and Antique Show

10:00am|Northwest Washington Fairgrounds

My Fair Lady

7:30pm|Anacortes Community Theatre

Spokes

7:30pm|Firehouse Arts and Events Center

Mixtape

7:30pm|Sylvia Center for the Arts

Whatcomics Call for Art

10:00am|Whatcom County

Wishes and Dreams Call for Art

10:00am|Gallery Syre

Gore and Lore Tours

6:00pm|Downtown Bellingham, historic Fairhaven

Anacortes Vintage Market's Evergreens and Icicles

6:00pm|Port Transit Event Center

Scream Fair's Camp Fear

7:00pm|Northwest Washington Fairgrounds

Matilda the Musical

7:30pm| Lincoln Theatre

Hellingham

7:30pm|Upfront Theatre

Squawktober

8:00pm|Old Main Theater

Community Pancake Breakfast

8:00am|Blaine Senior Center

Ferndale Breakfast

8:00am|Ferndale Senior Center

Orca Recovery Day Work Party

9:00am|Nooksack River

Anacortes Farmers Market

9:00am|Depot Arts Center

Yoga and Detox

9:00am|Community Food Co-op

Blanchard Beast Trail Race

9:00am|Blanchard Forest Lower Trailhead

Twin Sisters Farmers Markets

9:00am|North Fork Library

98221 Studio Tour

10:00am|Fidalgo Island

Bellingham Comicon

10:00am|Ferndale Event Center

Steam Expo

10:00am|Lynden Middle School

Bellingham Farmers Market

10:00am|Depot Market Square

Blaine Gardeners Market

10:00am|H Street Plaza

Your Life is a Story Writer's Group

10:30am|South Whatcom Library

Correspondence Club

10:30am|Mindport Exhibits

Fall Festival

11:00am|Camp Korey

Kraut-chi Ferment Class

11:00am|Chuckanut Center

Winter Warmth Drive and Pickup

11:00am|Assumption Church Gym

Art Therapy Workshop

1:30pm|Museum of Northwest Art

Telling Tough Stories

2:00pm|South Whatcom Library

Fables and Tales Upcycle Runway Challenge

6:00pm|Settlemeyer Hall

Concrete Ghost Walk

6:00pm|Concrete Theatre

Brew on the Slough

6:00pm|Maple Hall

Bellingham Hoptoberfest

6:00pm|Civic Way Sportsplex

How I Learned I'm Old

7:00pm|Village Books

Take Me to the River Live

7:30pm|Mount Baker Theatre

Skagit Symphony presents Highland Heritage

7:30pm|McIntyre Hall

Tomorrow
My Fair Lady

7:30pm|Anacortes Community Theatre

Spokes

7:30pm|Firehouse Arts and Events Center

Whatcomics Call for Art

10:00am|Whatcom County

Wishes and Dreams Call for Art

10:00am|Gallery Syre

Matilda the Musical

7:30pm| Lincoln Theatre

98221 Studio Tour

10:00am|Fidalgo Island

Sedro-Woolley Community Breakfast

8:00am|American Legion Post #43

Trails to Taps Relay

9:00am|Depot Market Square

Birchwood Farmers Market

10:00am|Park Manor Shopping Center

Bellingham Handmade Market

11:00am|Goods Nursery and Produce

Langar in Lynden

11:00am| Guru Nanak Gursikh Gurdwara

Wild Mushroom Show

12:00pm|Bloedel Donovan Community Building

Harvest Festival

1:00pm|Centennial Riverwalk

Skagit Topic

2:00pm|Skagit County Historical Museum

What If We All Bloomed?

4:00pm|Village Books

Murder Mystery Dessert Theater

6:00pm|Christ Fellowship Church

Monday
Wishes and Dreams Call for Art

10:00am|Gallery Syre

Whatcomics Call for Art

10:00am|Whatcom County

Whatcom Housing Week

10:00am|Whatcom County

Northwest Paella

6:30pm|Community Food Co-op

Poetrynight

7:00pm|Alternative Library

Guffawingham

9:00pm|Firefly Lounge

see our complete calendar »