Film

Can You Ever Forgive Me?

Melissa McCarthy gets real

Wednesday, November 7, 2018

Recently, in writing about A Star Is Born, I remarked on how unexceptional it was for a singer—in this case, Lady Gaga—to excel as a dramatic actor. It is no less unexceptional for a comedic actor to excel in drama, a truism demonstrated yet again by Melissa McCarthy in the marvelous Can You Ever Forgive Me? And yet, given the slam-bang slapstick featured in so many of her movies, I have to admit the subtlety and fullness of her performance in this film did hit me as a shock to the system.

McCarthy plays the real-life author Lee Israel, who was a successful celebrity magazine profiler and bestselling biographer in the 1970s and ’80s until readers’ tastes turned trendier and she found herself near-unemployable and drinking heavily. Without making a big deal about it, the film conveys what it’s like to be a writer on the edge at a time and place (the New York literary world of the 1990s) when to be unfashionable and yet in the thick of things was particularly painful.

It’s clear from the start McCarthy is not about to recap her usual slapstick ways. Lee’s brittle misanthropy, and not-so-quiet desperation, is everywhere evident. She attends the fancy party of the agent (Jane Curtin) who no longer returns her calls and steals an expensive winter coat from the coatroom. She tries, and fails, to sell a pile of books to a used bookshop in order to scrape together enough money to pay the rent and tend to her sick cat—her only trusted companion.

Through happenstance Lee discovers that a thriving market exists for signed letters from famous authors and actors. Utilizing a multiplicity of old typewriters, she proceeds to forge highly readable and witty letters from the likes of Dorothy Parker, Noel Coward, Marlene Dietrich, and many others. Eventually she took on an accomplice, the flamboyant and aptly named Jack Hock, played by Richard E. Grant with perfect desiccated panache. Jack, like Lee, is gay, and he is even more of a con artist, and even more down on his luck, than she is. Once again the filmmakers defy our expectations: This is not a cute caper about two rascally rogues. Beneath Jack’s brio, his loneliness is just as palpable as Lee’s.

I loved McCarthy in her breakthrough movie role in Bridesmaids, and I always look forward to her appearances on Saturday Night Live. But her movies for the most part since Bridesmaids have been terrible. Like Eddie Murphy, another potentially great actor who perpetually underuses his gifts, or, I fear, Tiffany Haddish, who in the space of little more than a year is already piling up a roster of stinkers undeserving of her brilliance, McCarthy can be her own worst enemy in her choice of material.

But no more, I wager, after Can You Ever Forgive Me?, a movie in which she doesn’t sell out her talent by becoming all serious in the manner of actors panting for Oscars, but instead extends the forcefulness of her comic persona into darker realms even she might not have been aware she could inhabit.

Silver Reef Smashmouth
More Film...
Mike Wallace Is Here
The hero we need

At first the title seems too simple, if not a bit stilted, especially for those who had never heard the name: Mike Wallace Is Here.

Yet as the documentary about the hard-hitting TV newsman soon makes clear, those are the four words no crooked politician or conniving businessperson ever…

more »
Good Boys
Out of the mouths of babes

A nearly one-note comedy about a trio of 12 year-old boys who will do anything they must to get to a “kissing party” attended by the girl one of them adores, Gene Stupnitsky’s Good Boys has an endless fascination with hearing preteens curse. Is it funny the first and fourth and…

more »
The Fall of the American Empire
The price of money

You could be forgiven for confusing the title of Canadian filmmaker Denys Arcand’s latest, the capitalist crime lark The Fall of the American Empire, with his 1986 battle-of-the-sexes talkathon, The Decline of the American Empire. Though they’re different stories, they’re cut from the…

more »
Events
Today
Boating Center Open

10:00am|Community Boating Center

Bard on the Beach

12:00pm|Vanier Park

Skagit Tours

10:53pm|Highway 20.

Skagit Tours

10:53pm|Highway 20.

Plover Ferry Rides

12:00pm|Blaine Harbor

Skagit Tours

10:53pm|Highway 20.

Plover Ferry Rides

12:00pm|Blaine Harbor

Rock Painting Workshop

12:00pm|Sumas Library

Camp Cooking Classes

5:30pm|REI

Hamster Church with Christen Mattix

6:30pm|Old Parish Hall

Poetrynight

7:00pm|Alternative Library

Guffawingham

9:00pm|Firefly Lounge

Silver Reef Stay and Fly Cascadia Weekly Subscribe Ad 1
Tomorrow
Boating Center Open

10:00am|Community Boating Center

Bard on the Beach

12:00pm|Vanier Park

Skagit Tours

10:53pm|Highway 20.

Skagit Tours

10:53pm|Highway 20.

Plover Ferry Rides

12:00pm|Blaine Harbor

Camp Cooking Classes

5:30pm|REI

Cook It and Book It

3:30pm| Lynden Library

Artist Workshop

6:00pm|Bellingham Public Library

History Sunset Cruises

6:30pm|Bellingham Bay

Books on Tap

7:00pm|Josh Vanderyacht Memorial Park

A Poetic Family

7:00pm|Village Books

Skagit Folk Dancers

7:00pm|Bayview Civic Hall

Punch Up Comedy Showcase and Open Mic

7:30pm|The Shakedown

Cascadia Weekly Subscribe Ad 1 Trove Web
Wednesday
Boating Center Open

10:00am|Community Boating Center

Bard on the Beach

12:00pm|Vanier Park

Skagit Tours

10:53pm|Highway 20.

Lynden Front Streeters

2:00pm|Inn at Lynden

Wednesday Farmers Market

2:00pm|Barkley Village Green

Ferndale Book Group

2:30pm|Ferndale Library

Sedro-Woolley Farmers Market

3:00pm|Hammer Heritage Square

Group Run

6:00pm|Skagit Running Company

Seafarers' Summer

6:00pm|Seafarers' Memorial Park

Brewers Cruise

6:30pm|Bellingham Cruise Terminal

Creekside Open Mic

6:30pm|South Whatcom Library

Ana Popovic

7:30pm|Bellingham High School

The Spitfire Grill

7:30pm|Performing Arts Center Mainstage

see our complete calendar »

Silver Reef Stay and Fly Cascadia Weekly Subscribe Ad 1 Trove Web Village Books